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How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy
by Jenny Odell

Language

English

Pages

241

Publication Date

April 23, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>** A<i> New York Times </i>Bestseller **<br /><br />"A complex, smart and ambitious book that at first reads like a self-help manual, then blossoms into a wide-ranging political manifesto."鈥擩onah Engel Bromwich, <i>The New York Times Book Review<br /></i></b><br /><b>One of President Barack Obama's "Favorite Books of 2019"</b><br /><br /><b><i>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY: Time聽</i>鈥?<i>The New Yorker</i> <b>鈥?lt;/b>聽<i>NPR</i>聽鈥⒙?lt;i>GQ聽</i>鈥⒙?lt;i>Elle聽</i>鈥⒙?lt;i>Vulture聽</i>鈥⒙?lt;i>Fortune聽</i>鈥?<i>Boing Boing</i>聽鈥⒙?lt;i>The Irish Times</i>聽鈥⒙燭he New York Public Library聽<b>鈥?The Brooklyn Public Library</b><br /></b><br /><b>Porchlight's Personal Development & Human Behavior Book of the Year</b><br /><br />Nothing is harder to do these days than nothing. But in a world where our value is determined by our 24/7 data productivity . . . doing nothing may be our most important form of resistance. <br /><br />So argues artist and critic Jenny Odell in this field guide to doing nothing (at least as capitalism defines it). Odell sees our attention as the most precious鈥攁nd overdrawn鈥攔esource we have. Once we can start paying a new kind of attention, she writes, we can undertake bolder forms of political action, reimagine humankind鈥檚 role in the environment, and arrive at more meaningful understandings of happiness and progress. <br /><br />Far from the simple anti-technology screed, or the back-to-nature meditation we read so often, <i>How to do Nothing</i> is an action plan for thinking outside of capitalist narratives of efficiency and techno-determinism. Provocative, timely, and utterly persuasive, this book is a four-course meal in the age of Soylent.
Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and ...
by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Language

English

Pages

410

Publication Date

September 16, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In <i>Braiding Sweetgrass</i>, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on 鈥渁 journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise鈥?(Elizabeth Gilbert).<br /><br /> Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings鈥攁sters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass鈥攐ffer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.
Isaac's Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in Hist...
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

338

Publication Date

October 19, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
At the dawn of the twentieth century, a great confidence suffused America. Isaac Cline was one of the era's new men, a scientist who believed he knew all there was to know about the motion of clouds and the behavior of storms. The idea that a hurricane could damage the city of Galveston, Texas, where he was based, was to him preposterous, "an absurd delusion." It was 1900, a year when America felt bigger and stronger than ever before. Nothing in nature could hobble the gleaming city of Galveston, then a magical place that seemed destined to become the New York of the Gulf.<br /><br />That August, a strange, prolonged heat wave gripped the nation and killed scores of people in New York and Chicago. Odd things seemed to happen everywhere: A plague of crickets engulfed Waco. The Bering Glacier began to shrink. Rain fell on Galveston with greater intensity than anyone could remember. Far away, in Africa, immense thunderstorms blossomed over the city of Dakar, and great currents of wind converged. A wave of atmospheric turbulence slipped from the coast of western Africa. Most such waves faded quickly. This one did not.<br /><br />In Cuba, America's overconfidence was made all too obvious by the Weather Bureau's obsession with controlling hurricane forecasts, even though Cuba's indigenous weathermen had pioneered hurricane science. As the bureau's forecasters assured the nation that all was calm in the Caribbean, Cuba's own weathermen fretted about ominous signs in the sky. A curious stillness gripped Antigua. Only a few unlucky sea captains discovered that the storm had achieved an intensity no man alive had ever experienced.<br /><br />In Galveston, reassured by Cline's belief that no hurricane could seriously damage the city, there was celebration. Children played in the rising water. Hundreds of people gathered at the beach to marvel at the fantastically tall waves and gorgeous pink sky, until the surf began ripping the city's beloved beachfront apart. Within the next few hours Galveston would endure a hurricane that to this day remains the nation's deadliest natural disaster. In Galveston alone at least 6,000 people, possibly as many as 10,000, would lose their lives, a number far greater than the combined death toll of the Johnstown Flood and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.<br /><br />And Isaac Cline would experience his own unbearable loss.<br /><br />Meticulously researched and vividly written, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> is based on Cline's own letters, telegrams, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the hows and whys of great storms. Ultimately, however, it is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets nature's last great uncontrollable force. As such, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> carries a warning for our time.
Nature's Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in...
by Douglas W. Tallamy

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

February 04, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b><br /><br /> Douglas W. Tallamy鈥檚 first book, <i>Bringing Nature Home,</i> awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. In this new book, Tallamy takes the next step and outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation.<i> Nature鈥檚 Best Hope</i> shows how homeowners everywhere can turn their yards into conservation corridors that provide wildlife habitats. Because this approach relies on the initiatives of private individuals, it is immune from the whims of government policy. Even more important, it鈥檚 practical, effective, and easy鈥攜ou will walk away with specific suggestions you can incorporate into your own yard.<br /> 聽<br /> If you鈥檙e concerned about doing something good for the environment, <i>Nature鈥檚 Best Hope</i> is the blueprint you need. By acting now, you can help preserve our precious wildlife鈥攁nd the planet鈥攆or future generations.<br /> 聽
The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
by David Wallace-Wells

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

February 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1聽<i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER 鈥?鈥?lt;i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i>聽hits you like a comet, with an overflow of insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon.鈥濃€擜ndrew Solomon, author of聽<i>The Noonday Demon</i></b><br /><br /><b><b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY聽<i>The New Yorker聽</i>鈥?lt;i>聽The New York Times Book Review聽</i>鈥⒙?lt;i>Time聽</i>鈥?NPR 鈥⒙?lt;i>The Economist聽</i>鈥?<i>The Paris Review</i> 鈥⒙?lt;i>Toronto Star聽聽</i>鈥⒙?lt;i>GQ</i>聽鈥⒙?lt;i>The Times Literary Supplement</i>聽鈥?The New York Public Library聽鈥⒙?lt;i>Kirkus Reviews</i></b><br /></b><br />It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible鈥攆ood shortages, refugee emergencies, climate wars and economic devastation.<br /><br /> An 鈥渆poch-defining book鈥?(<i>The</i> <i>Guardian</i>) and 鈥渢his generation鈥檚 <i>Silent Spring</i>鈥?(<i>The Washington Post</i>), <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i>聽is both a travelogue of the near future and a meditation on how that future will look to those living through it鈥攖he ways that warming promises to transform global politics, the meaning of technology and nature in the modern world, the sustainability of capitalism and the trajectory of human progress.<br /><br /> <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is also an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation鈥攖oday鈥檚.<br /><br /><b>LONGLISTED FOR THE PEN/E.O. WILSON LITERARY SCIENCE WRITING AWARD</b><br /><br /><i>鈥淭he Uninhabitable Earth</i>聽is the most terrifying book I have ever read. Its subject is climate change, and its method is scientific, but its mode is Old Testament. The book is a meticulously documented, white-knuckled tour through the cascading catastrophes that will soon engulf our warming planet.鈥?lt;b>鈥擣arhad Manjoo,聽<i>The New York Times</i></b><i><b><br /></b></i><br />鈥淩iveting. . . .聽Some readers will find Mr. Wallace-Wells鈥檚 outline of possible futures alarmist. He is indeed alarmed. You should be, too.鈥?lt;b>鈥?lt;/b><i><b>The Economist</b></i><br /><br />鈥淧otent and evocative. . . . Wallace-Wells has resolved to offer something other than the standard narrative of climate change. . . . He avoids the 鈥榚erily banal language of climatology鈥?in favor of lush, rolling prose.鈥?lt;b>鈥擩ennifer Szalai,聽<i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br />鈥淭he book has potential to be this generation鈥檚聽<i>Silent Spring</i>.鈥?lt;i><b>鈥擳he Washington Post</b></i><br /><br />鈥?lt;i>The Uninhabitable Earth,</i>聽which has become a best seller, taps into the underlying emotion of the day: fear. . . . I encourage people to read this book.鈥?lt;b>鈥擜lan Weisman,聽<i>The New York Review of Books</i></b>
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
by Elizabeth Kolbert

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 11, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>ONE OF THE <i>NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW'S</i> 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR</b></p><p><b>A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes</b> <br />Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In <i>The Sixth Extinction</i>, two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and <i>New Yorker</i> writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.</p>
Fewer, Richer, Greener: Prospects for Humanity in an Age of Abund...
by Laurence B. Siegel

Language

English

Pages

459

Publication Date

November 26, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>How the world has become <i>much better </i>and why optimism is abundantly justified</b></p> <p>Why do so many people fear the future? Is their concern justified, or can we look forward to greater wealth and continued improvement in the way we live?</p> <p>Our world seems to be experiencing stagnant economic growth, climatic deterioration, dwindling natural resources, and an unsustainable level of population growth. The world is doomed, they argue, and there are just too many problems to overcome<i>. But is this really the case?</i> In <i>Fewer, Richer, Greener</i>, author Laurence B. Siegel reveals that the world has <i>improved</i>鈥攁nd will continue to improve鈥攊n almost every dimension imaginable.</p> <p>This practical yet lighthearted book makes a convincing case for having gratitude for today鈥檚 world and optimism about the bountiful world of tomorrow. Life has actually <i>improved</i> tremendously. We live in the safest, most prosperous time in all human history. Whatever the metric鈥攆ood, health, longevity, education, conflict鈥攊t is demonstrably true that <i>right now</i> is the best time to be alive. The recent, dramatic slowing in global population growth continues to spread prosperity from the developed to the developing world. Technology is helping billions of people rise above levels of mere subsistence. This technology of prosperity is cumulative and rapidly improving: we use it to solve problems in ways that would have be unimaginable only a few decades ago. An optimistic antidote for pessimism and fear, this book:</p> <ul> <li>Helps to restore and reinforce our faith in the future</li> <li>Documents and explains how global changes impact our present and influence our future</li> <li>Discusses the costs and unforeseen consequences of some of the changes occurring in the modern world</li> <li>Offers engaging narrative, accurate data and research, and an in-depth look at the best books on the topic by leading thinkers</li> <li>Traces the history of economic progress and explores its consequences for human life around the world</li> </ul> <p><i>Fewer, Richer, Greener: Prospects for Humanity in an Age of Abundance </i>is a must-read for anyone who wishes to regain hope for the present and wants to build a better future.</p>
Growth: From Microorganisms to Megacities (The MIT Press)
by Vaclav Smil

Language

English

Pages

655

Publication Date

September 06, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>A systematic investigation of growth in nature and society, from tiny organisms to the trajectories of empires and civilizations.</b></p><p>Growth has been both an unspoken and an explicit aim of our individual and collective striving. It governs the lives of microorganisms and galaxies; it shapes the capabilities of our extraordinarily large brains and the fortunes of our economies. Growth is manifested in annual increments of continental crust, a rising gross domestic product, a child's growth chart, the spread of cancerous cells. In this magisterial book, Vaclav Smil offers systematic investigation of growth in nature and society, from tiny organisms to the trajectories of empires and civilizations. </p><p>Smil takes readers from bacterial invasions through animal metabolisms to megacities and the global economy. He begins with organisms whose mature sizes range from microscopic to enormous, looking at disease-causing microbes, the cultivation of staple crops, and human growth from infancy to adulthood. He examines the growth of energy conversions and man-made objects that enable economic activities鈥攄evelopments that have been essential to civilization. Finally, he looks at growth in complex systems, beginning with the growth of human populations and proceeding to the growth of cities. He considers the challenges of tracing the growth of empires and civilizations, explaining that we can chart the growth of organisms across individual and evolutionary time, but that the progress of societies and economies, not so linear, encompasses both decline and renewal. The trajectory of modern civilization, driven by competing imperatives of material growth and biospheric limits, Smil tells us, remains uncertain.</p>
A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Tra...
by Bill Bryson

Language

English

Pages

305

Publication Date

September 08, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
</b><br />Back in America after twenty years in Britain, Bill Bryson decided to reacquaint himself with his native country by walking the 2,100-mile Appalachian Trail, which stretches from Georgia to Maine. The AT offers an astonishing landscape of silent forests and sparkling lakes<b>鈥?lt;/b>and to a writer with the comic genius of Bill Bryson, it also provides endless opportunities to witness the majestic silliness of his fellow human beings.<br /><br />For a start there's the gloriously out-of-shape Stephen Katz, a buddy from Iowa along for the walk. Despite Katz's overwhelming desire to find cozy restaurants, he and Bryson eventually settle into their stride, and while on the trail they meet a bizarre assortment of hilarious characters. But <i>A Walk in the Woods</i> is more than just a laugh-out-loud hike. Bryson's acute eye is a wise witness to this beautiful but fragile trail, and as he tells its fascinating history, he makes a moving plea for the conservation of America's last great wilderness. An adventure, a comedy, and a celebration, <i>A Walk in the Woods</i> has become聽a modern classic of travel literature.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Cry of the Kalahari
by , Delia Owens

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

April 22, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>鈥淎 remarkable story beautifully told鈥mong such classics as Goodall鈥檚 <i>In the Shadow of Man </i>and Fossey鈥檚 <i>Gorillas in the Mist</i>.鈥濃€?lt;i>Chicago Tribune</i></b><br /><br /> Carrying little more than a change of clothes and a pair of binoculars, two young Americans, Mark and Delia Owens, caught a plane to Africa, bought a thirdhand Land Rover, and drove deep into the Kalahari Desert. There they lived for seven years, in an unexplored area with no roads, no people, and no source of water for thousands of square miles. In this vast wilderness the Owenses began their zoology research, working along animals that had never before been exposed to humans.<br /><br /> An international bestseller, Cry of the Kalahari is the story of the Owenses鈥檚 life with lions, brown hyenas, jackals, giraffes, and the many other creatures they came to know. It is also a gripping account of how they survived the dangers of living in one of the last and largest pristine areas on Earth.</p>

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