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The Disaster Preparedness Handbook: A Guide for Families
by Arthur T. Bradley

Language

English

Pages

544

Publication Date

July 20, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Let survival expert, Army veteran, NASA scientist help you and your family prepare for any kind of disaster鈥攆lood, civil unrest, hurricane, fire, war, earthquake.</b><br /><br />Ninety-nine percent of the time, the world spins like a top, the skies are clear, and your refrigerator is full of good food. But the world is a volatile place鈥攕torms rage, fires burn, and diseases spread. No one is ever completely safe. Humans live as part of a very complex ecosystem that is unpredictable and merciless. Could you protect your family in the case of an emergency鈥攄omestic or global?<br /><br />The <i>Disaster Preparedness Handbook</i> will help you to establish a practical disaster plan for your entire family (covering all fourteen basic human needs) in case the unpredictable happens. Additional information is also presented for those with special needs, including the elderly and disabled, children, pregnant women, and even pets.<br /><br />Well-researched by an army veteran and current NASA engineer, this is the essential guide every family should have, study, and keep handy, in case the unthinkable should occur.
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
by Elizabeth Kolbert

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 11, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>ONE OF THE <i>NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW'S</i> 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR</b></p><p><b>A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes</b> <br />Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In <i>The Sixth Extinction</i>, two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and <i>New Yorker</i> writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.</p>
Fewer, Richer, Greener: Prospects for Humanity in an Age of Abund...
by Laurence B. Siegel

Language

English

Pages

459

Publication Date

November 26, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>How the world has become <i>much better </i>and why optimism is abundantly justified</b></p> <p>Why do so many people fear the future? Is their concern justified, or can we look forward to greater wealth and continued improvement in the way we live?</p> <p>Our world seems to be experiencing stagnant economic growth, climatic deterioration, dwindling natural resources, and an unsustainable level of population growth. The world is doomed, they argue, and there are just too many problems to overcome<i>. But is this really the case?</i> In <i>Fewer, Richer, Greener</i>, author Laurence B. Siegel reveals that the world has <i>improved</i>鈥攁nd will continue to improve鈥攊n almost every dimension imaginable.</p> <p>This practical yet lighthearted book makes a convincing case for having gratitude for today鈥檚 world and optimism about the bountiful world of tomorrow. Life has actually <i>improved</i> tremendously. We live in the safest, most prosperous time in all human history. Whatever the metric鈥攆ood, health, longevity, education, conflict鈥攊t is demonstrably true that <i>right now</i> is the best time to be alive. The recent, dramatic slowing in global population growth continues to spread prosperity from the developed to the developing world. Technology is helping billions of people rise above levels of mere subsistence. This technology of prosperity is cumulative and rapidly improving: we use it to solve problems in ways that would have be unimaginable only a few decades ago. An optimistic antidote for pessimism and fear, this book:</p> <ul> <li>Helps to restore and reinforce our faith in the future</li> <li>Documents and explains how global changes impact our present and influence our future</li> <li>Discusses the costs and unforeseen consequences of some of the changes occurring in the modern world</li> <li>Offers engaging narrative, accurate data and research, and an in-depth look at the best books on the topic by leading thinkers</li> <li>Traces the history of economic progress and explores its consequences for human life around the world</li> </ul> <p><i>Fewer, Richer, Greener: Prospects for Humanity in an Age of Abundance </i>is a must-read for anyone who wishes to regain hope for the present and wants to build a better future.</p>
Isaac's Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in Hist...
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

338

Publication Date

October 19, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
At the dawn of the twentieth century, a great confidence suffused America. Isaac Cline was one of the era's new men, a scientist who believed he knew all there was to know about the motion of clouds and the behavior of storms. The idea that a hurricane could damage the city of Galveston, Texas, where he was based, was to him preposterous, "an absurd delusion." It was 1900, a year when America felt bigger and stronger than ever before. Nothing in nature could hobble the gleaming city of Galveston, then a magical place that seemed destined to become the New York of the Gulf.<br /><br />That August, a strange, prolonged heat wave gripped the nation and killed scores of people in New York and Chicago. Odd things seemed to happen everywhere: A plague of crickets engulfed Waco. The Bering Glacier began to shrink. Rain fell on Galveston with greater intensity than anyone could remember. Far away, in Africa, immense thunderstorms blossomed over the city of Dakar, and great currents of wind converged. A wave of atmospheric turbulence slipped from the coast of western Africa. Most such waves faded quickly. This one did not.<br /><br />In Cuba, America's overconfidence was made all too obvious by the Weather Bureau's obsession with controlling hurricane forecasts, even though Cuba's indigenous weathermen had pioneered hurricane science. As the bureau's forecasters assured the nation that all was calm in the Caribbean, Cuba's own weathermen fretted about ominous signs in the sky. A curious stillness gripped Antigua. Only a few unlucky sea captains discovered that the storm had achieved an intensity no man alive had ever experienced.<br /><br />In Galveston, reassured by Cline's belief that no hurricane could seriously damage the city, there was celebration. Children played in the rising water. Hundreds of people gathered at the beach to marvel at the fantastically tall waves and gorgeous pink sky, until the surf began ripping the city's beloved beachfront apart. Within the next few hours Galveston would endure a hurricane that to this day remains the nation's deadliest natural disaster. In Galveston alone at least 6,000 people, possibly as many as 10,000, would lose their lives, a number far greater than the combined death toll of the Johnstown Flood and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.<br /><br />And Isaac Cline would experience his own unbearable loss.<br /><br />Meticulously researched and vividly written, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> is based on Cline's own letters, telegrams, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the hows and whys of great storms. Ultimately, however, it is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets nature's last great uncontrollable force. As such, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> carries a warning for our time.
Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Li...
by Lydia Denworth

Language

English

Pages

301

Publication Date

January 28, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A Next Big Idea Club Must-Read Nonfiction Book of Winter 2020<br /><br /><br /><br />A revelatory investigation of friendship, with profound implications for our understanding of what humans and animals alike need to thrive across a lifetime.</strong></p><br /><p>The phenomenon of friendship is universal and elemental. Friends, after all, are the family we choose. But what makes these bonds not just pleasant but essential, and how do they affect our bodies and our minds?</p><br /><p>In <em>Friendship</em>, science journalist Lydia Denworth takes us in search of friendship鈥檚 biological, psychological, and evolutionary foundations. She finds friendship to be as old as early life on the African savannas鈥攚hen tribes of people grew large enough for individuals to seek fulfillment of their social needs outside their immediate families. Denworth sees this urge to connect reflected in primates, too, taking us to a monkey sanctuary in Puerto Rico and a baboon colony in Kenya to examine social bonds that offer insight into our own. She meets scientists at the frontiers of brain and genetics research and discovers that friendship is reflected in our brain waves, our genomes, and our cardiovascular and immune systems; its opposite, loneliness, can kill. At long last, social connection is recognized as critical to wellness and longevity.</p><br /><p>With insight and warmth, Denworth weaves past and present, field biology and neuroscience, to show how our bodies and minds are designed for friendship across life stages, the processes by which healthy social bonds are developed and maintained, and how friendship is changing in the age of social media. Blending compelling science, storytelling, and a grand evolutionary perspective, Denworth delineates the essential role that cooperation and companionship play in creating human (and nonhuman) societies.</p><br /><p><em>Friendship</em> illuminates the vital aspects of friendship, both visible and invisible, and offers a refreshingly optimistic vision of human nature. It is a clarion call for putting positive relationships at the center of our lives.</p>
Nature's Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in...
by Douglas W. Tallamy

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

February 04, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>鈥淭allamy聽lays out all you need to know to participate in one of the great conservation projects of our time. Read it and get started!鈥?鈥擡lizabeth Kolbert, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of <i>The Sixth Extinction</i></b><br /><br /> Douglas W. Tallamy鈥檚 first book, <i>Bringing Nature Home,</i> awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. In this new book, Tallamy takes the next step and outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation.<i> Nature鈥檚 Best Hope</i> shows how homeowners everywhere can turn their yards into conservation corridors that provide wildlife habitats. Because this approach relies on the initiatives of private individuals, it is immune from the whims of government policy. Even more important, it鈥檚 practical, effective, and easy鈥攜ou will walk away with specific suggestions you can incorporate into your own yard.<br /> 聽<br /> If you鈥檙e concerned about doing something good for the environment, <i>Nature鈥檚 Best Hope</i> is the blueprint you need. By acting now, you can help preserve our precious wildlife鈥攁nd the planet鈥攆or future generations.<br /> 聽
The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
by David Wallace-Wells

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

February 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1聽<i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER 鈥?鈥?lt;i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i>聽hits you like a comet, with an overflow of insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon.鈥濃€擜ndrew Solomon, author of聽<i>The Noonday Demon</i></b><br /><br /><b><b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY聽<i>The New Yorker聽</i>鈥?lt;i>聽The New York Times Book Review聽</i>鈥⒙?lt;i>Time聽</i>鈥?NPR 鈥⒙?lt;i>The Economist聽</i>鈥?<i>The Paris Review</i> 鈥⒙?lt;i>Toronto Star聽聽</i>鈥⒙?lt;i>GQ</i>聽鈥⒙?lt;i>The Times Literary Supplement</i>聽鈥?The New York Public Library聽鈥⒙?lt;i>Kirkus Reviews</i></b><br /></b><br />It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible鈥攆ood shortages, refugee emergencies, climate wars and economic devastation.<br /><br /> An 鈥渆poch-defining book鈥?(<i>The</i> <i>Guardian</i>) and 鈥渢his generation鈥檚 <i>Silent Spring</i>鈥?(<i>The Washington Post</i>), <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i>聽is both a travelogue of the near future and a meditation on how that future will look to those living through it鈥攖he ways that warming promises to transform global politics, the meaning of technology and nature in the modern world, the sustainability of capitalism and the trajectory of human progress.<br /><br /> <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is also an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation鈥攖oday鈥檚.<br /><br /><b>LONGLISTED FOR THE PEN/E.O. WILSON LITERARY SCIENCE WRITING AWARD</b><br /><br /><i>鈥淭he Uninhabitable Earth</i>聽is the most terrifying book I have ever read. Its subject is climate change, and its method is scientific, but its mode is Old Testament. The book is a meticulously documented, white-knuckled tour through the cascading catastrophes that will soon engulf our warming planet.鈥?lt;b>鈥擣arhad Manjoo,聽<i>The New York Times</i></b><i><b><br /></b></i><br />鈥淩iveting. . . .聽Some readers will find Mr. Wallace-Wells鈥檚 outline of possible futures alarmist. He is indeed alarmed. You should be, too.鈥?lt;b>鈥?lt;/b><i><b>The Economist</b></i><br /><br />鈥淧otent and evocative. . . . Wallace-Wells has resolved to offer something other than the standard narrative of climate change. . . . He avoids the 鈥榚erily banal language of climatology鈥?in favor of lush, rolling prose.鈥?lt;b>鈥擩ennifer Szalai,聽<i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br />鈥淭he book has potential to be this generation鈥檚聽<i>Silent Spring</i>.鈥?lt;i><b>鈥擳he Washington Post</b></i><br /><br />鈥?lt;i>The Uninhabitable Earth,</i>聽which has become a best seller, taps into the underlying emotion of the day: fear. . . . I encourage people to read this book.鈥?lt;b>鈥擜lan Weisman,聽<i>The New York Review of Books</i></b>
Three Seconds Until Midnight
by , John Walsh

Language

English

Pages

936

Publication Date

November 03, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In 1918, a strain of the Influenza virus mutated to transform itself into a rampant pulmonary disease, and it became one of the three deadliest plagues ever recorded in human history. It will happen again, it may involve a strain of flu that is worse, and it will involve population densities that were not a factor in 1918. Under the current U.S. National Pandemic Influenza Plan, some 123 million Americans will not have access to a protective vaccine or antiviral drug, until the peak of the epidemic is almost past. This book describes other major faults and assumptions in US planning and it describes several major steps that must be taken to improve readiness for the next major lethal pandemic event.
A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition
by Bill Bryson

Language

English

Pages

692

Publication Date

November 30, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>This new edition of the acclaimed bestseller is lavishly illustrated to convey, in pictures as in words, Bill Bryson鈥檚 exciting, informative journey into the world of science.</b><i><br /></i><br />In <i>A Short History of Nearly Everything</i>, the bestselling author聽of <i>A Walk in the Woods </i>and<i> The Body,</i>聽confronts his greatest challenge yet: to understand鈥攁nd, if possible, answer鈥攖he oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as his territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being <i>us</i>. The result is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it.<br /><br />Now, in this handsome new edition, Bill Bryson鈥檚 words are supplemented by full-color artwork that explains in visual terms the concepts and wonder of science, at the same time giving face to the major players in the world of scientific study. Eloquently and entertainingly described, as well as richly illustrated, science has never been more involving or entertaining.
Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greates...
by Dava Sobel

Language

English

Pages

191

Publication Date

July 05, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The dramatic human story of an epic scientific quest and of one man's forty-year obsession to find a solution to the thorniest scientific dilemma of the day--"the longitude problem."</b><br /><br />Anyone alive in the eighteenth century would have known that "the longitude problem" was the thorniest scientific dilemma of the day-and had been for centuries. Lacking the ability to measure their longitude, sailors throughout the great ages of exploration had been literally lost at sea as soon as they lost sight of land. Thousands of lives and the increasing fortunes of nations hung on a resolution. One man, John Harrison, in complete opposition to the scientific community, dared to imagine a mechanical solution-a clock that would keep precise time at sea, something no clock had ever been able to do on land. <br /><i><br /></i><i>Longitude</i> is the dramatic human story of an epic scientific quest and of Harrison's forty-year obsession with building his perfect timekeeper, known today as the chronometer. Full of heroism and chicanery, it is also a fascinating brief history of astronomy, navigation, and clockmaking, and opens a new window on our world.

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